Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain


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The emergence of multisensory systems through perceptual. Because the timing of neural development in primates and humans differs it is heterochronous , the developmental emergence of multisensory perception probably differs across species see Box 2 for putative neural mechanisms. Audiovisual temporal. Immediate improvement of speech-in-noise perception. Stein Editors Marcus J.

Multisensory Integration in Non-Human Primates during a Sensory-Motor Task

Parietal, temporal, and occipita projections to cortex. Marcus J. Naumer has written: Multisensory object perception in the primate brain -- subject s : Anatomy, Brain, Perception, Visual perception, Primates, Cerebral Cortex, Physiology.

Metacognition — the ability to monitor one s own decisions and representations, their accuracy and uncertainty — is considered a hallmark of intelligent behavior. Little is known about metacognition in our natural multisensory environment. To form a coherent percept, the brain should integrate signals from a common cause but segregate those from independent causes. Active and passive touch differentially activate somatosensory cortex in texture perception. Human Brain Mapping. Visuo-haptic Perception of Objects and Scenes.

Book chapters

N, Shams, L. New insights into multisensory perception, Guest editorial in Perception. Multisensory features can be acquired in the mature brain. Studies have found that primates can learn multisensory associations, and in the case of haptic—visual associations, multimodal areas such as the Anterior Rhinal Cortex 41,42 are necessary forthis learning. However, Gibson and Maunsell 43 found that macaque monkeys learned. Wallace, Juliane Krueger, and David W. Various aspects of the multisensory nature of perception are distinguished from and J.

This book explores mechanisms of multisensory integration of object-related information, focused on visual, auditory, and tactile sensory modalities. Covers audio-visual and visuo-tactile processing, and plasticity, offering human and nonhuman primate studies. Temporal synchrony - vision affects our auditory localisation - the brain infers that the visual and auditory info must be from the same source - which should be in the same location.

When the stimuli producing the sound as well as vision are close together, there seems to be a direct relationship formed in the perception of these separate.

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The brain is able to maximize its detection and evaluation of external events by the process of multisensory integration, whereby information from different senses is synthesized and used in concert. Multisensory Research Laboratory - vkc. Multisensory object perception in the primate brain. Jochen Kaiser; Marcus J Naumer; -- Traditionally a large proportion of perceptual research has assumed a specialization of cortical regions for the processing of stimuli in a single sensory modality.

Ghazanfar If multisensory speech is the default mode of perception, then this should be J. Kaiser eds. It should come as no surprise to those interested in sensory processes that its research history is among the longest. The research topic, Sub-and supra-second timing: brain, learning and development can be found in Frontiers here. Multisensory Object Perception - DocCheck. Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain : It should come as no surprise to those interested in sensory processes that its research history is among the longest and richest of the many systematic efforts to understand how our bodies function.

The continuing obsession with sensory systems is as much a re?

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Traditionally a large proportion of perceptual research has assumed a specialization of cortical regions for the processing of stimuli in a single sensory modality. Juliane Krueger - Academia. Visuo-haptic perception of objects and scenes in, editor s Marcus J. Book Chapter. A multisensory perspective on object memory Assessing the role of the 'unity assumption' on multisensory integration. Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate …, Marcus Naumer.

Jochen Kaiser. Download with Google Download with Facebook or download with email. Multisensory integration - Wikipedia. Investigating human audio-visual object perception Despite the large number of studies on the multisensory aspects of tactile perception, very little is known regarding the effects of visual and auditory sensory modalities on the tactile hedonic evaluation of textures, especially when the presentation of the stimuli is mediated by a haptic device. Multisensory Integration Flashcards Quizlet.

The findings cited in The Handbook of Multisensory Processes suggest that there are broad underlying principles that govern this interaction, regardless of the specific senses involved. The book is organized thematically into eight sections; each of the 55 chapters presents a state-of-the-art review of its topic by leading researchers in the field.

We examined if the reaction time to a given stimulus was affected by the modality switch, i. For each monkey separately and human subjects put together, reaction times for each modality were split with respect to the previous modality: for instance, all reaction times to AV stimuli that were preceded by A, reaction times to AV stimuli preceded by V and so on.

In a second time, we investigated whether modality switch could have an influence on gains. These proportions were calculated for each group of stimuli. This analysis was done for each monkeys and humans. We sought to determine which physical parameters of the images could have an impact on reaction times and gains.

For images, we first determined mean, variance, and signal to noise ratio values of gray level pixels. Second-order statistics were computed from co-occurrence matrices that contain the number of occurrences of two gray-level values, separated by a given pixel distance in a given direction in the image [ 34 ]. As images used for humans were in color, these second order parameters were calculated for each three levels of color red, green, blue and then averaged.

For the acoustic analysis, we examined low level parameters, namely the mean intensity of sounds on the full duration, and other parameters on the first ms of the sounds: mean intensity, intensity and time of the peak, root mean square RMS and transience see Table 1 for the formula. We also examined the richness of sounds based on the model of Chi and collaborators [ 35 ] which is inspired by psycho-acoustical and neurophysiological findings in the auditory system. This model generates spectrograms of the sounds and a parameter called the ratescale.

Ratescale is a 4D matrix which is a combination between descriptors of the spectrotemporal modulation Rate, 2D and the distribution of energy in the frequency channels scale, 2D. For example, the human voice has a high scale because it consists of specific small bands of frequencies that are energy rich, whereas white noise has a low scale because of an evenly distributed energy across large bands of frequency.

For analytic purposes, the average of the 4d matrix was extracted according to the spatial dimensions to compute the rate scale over time. All ratescale computations have been computed with NSL toolbox in Matlab [ 35 ]. We have put together sounds of each group of stimuli as defined above according to the gains and race-model and calculated the mean ratescale across time.

Because the distribution of reaction times and gains were not normal for any tested condition Shapiro-Wilk test , we used a Kruskal-Wallis test for reaction times, gains, physical parameters for multiple comparisons, Friedman test for ratescale values for multiple paired comparisons and post hoc were done using a Mann-Whitney test or a Wilcoxon test with the Bonferroni correction. We used a Mann-Whitney test for reaction times and for gains and Wilcoxon test for Race model comparisons for simple comparisons.

We used a Pearson Chi square test to compare the proportion of congruent and incongruent stimuli between different stimuli groups defined above. Pearson Chi square test was also used to compare the proportion of weak and strong stimuli and to compare the proportion of stimuli of each category in the different groups.

We first studied the effect of the modality on reaction times. As reported in previous studies, we found that, for both monkeys and for human subjects, the modality of the stimulus had a strong effect on reaction times RT. We indeed found significant shorter reaction times in AV condition and longer reaction times in A condition Fig 1 and S1 Table. To characterize this modality effect, we calculated the multisensory gain according to the formula described in the method section.


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Because the auditory modality was the slowest, the mean multisensory gain was computed from the V and AV reaction times. The mean multisensory gain was rather low for monkeys 2. We also examined whether the race model could explain our results. When the race model was applied to the overall set of trials, we unexpectedly observed that the race model was satisfied. The validation of the race model was present for both monkeys and the human data meaning that multisensory integration was not responsible for the shortening in bimodal RTs.

Blue box plots correspond to auditory A , green to visual V and red to auditory—visual AV stimuli. The box and horizontal bar within represent the interquartile range and the median of RT, respectively. The whiskers extend to the most extreme data point, which is no more than 1. We then examined salience, congruence and category effects, as well as their cross effects, on reaction times.

Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain
Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain Multisensory Object Perception in the Primate Brain

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